The Honorable Judge Roy Moore

By David J. Stewart

Proverb 13:13, “Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.”

The honorable Judge Roy Moore standing by God's Ten Commandments.       It was a sad and tragic day in America on November 13, 2003 when Alabama Judge Roy Moore was fired from office for refusing to remove a monument displaying the Ten Commandments in the courthouse. Can we really ask ourselves “why” when our fellow citizens commit unspeakable heinous acts of crime? As Americans we get what we deserve. God will not be mocked.

It is a mournful day in America when Sodomites are getting married legally. The State of Vermont just legalized sodomite marriages. America has forsaken the God of the Bible. Homosexuality is a sin, a violation of God's holy Law. To legalize sin against God is to willfully and publicly flout the order of God almighty. It was Judge Moore's eight peers1 on the Alabama Supreme Court who used those exact words against him, ousting him from his position because . . .

“The ethics panel said Moore put himself above the law by 'willfully and publicly' flouting the order to remove the 2.6-ton monument from the state judicial building's rotunda in August.”

SOURCE: CNN.com - Ten Commandments judge removed from office - Nov. 14, 2003

God will judge those judges out of the words of their own mouths, who put themselves above God's Law. Judge Moore was accused of willfully and publiclyflouting the court's order to remove the Ten Commandments. Yet, it is those very same judges who willfully and publiclyflout God's holy Commandments. I am not being unkind, just truthful. God's Law is the highest Law in the universe.

Poem by Judge Roy Moore

The below poem is often quoted from Judge Roy Moore when he speaks:

America the Beautiful,
or so you used to be.
Land of the Pilgrims' pride;
I'm glad they'll never see.

Babies piled in dumpsters,
Abortion on demand,
Oh, sweet land of liberty;
your house is on the sand.

Our children wander aimlessly
poisoned by cocaine,
Choosing to indulge their lusts,
when God has said abstain.

From sea to shining sea,
our Nation turns away
From the teaching of God's love
and a need to always pray.

We've kept God in our temples,
how callous we have grown.
When earth is but His footstool,
and Heaven is His throne.

We've voted in a government
that's rotting at the core,
Appointing Godless Judges
who throw reason out the door,

Too soft to place a killer
in a well deserved tomb,
But brave enough to kill a baby
before he leaves the womb.

You think that God's not angry,
that our land's a moral slum?
How much longer will He wait
before His judgment comes?

How are we to face our God,
from Whom we cannot hide?
What then is left for us to do,
but stem this evil tide?

If we who are His children,
will humbly turn and pray;
Seek His holy face
and mend our evil way:

Then God will hear from Heaven
and forgive us of our sins,
He'll heal our sickly land
and those who live within.

But, America the Beautiful,
if you don't - then you will see,
A sad but Holy God
withdraw His hand from Thee.

Judge Roy Moore Poem

The above poem was written by Judge Roy Moore.


Here's a disturbing NEWSWEEK article from April of 2009 which confirms everything Judge Moore said . . .

RELIGION

The End of Christian America

The percentage of self-identified Christians has fallen 10 points in the past two decades. How that statistic explains who we are now—and what, as a nation, we are about to become.


On the Foundation’s homepage, this week’s America Acknowledges God highlights Moses with the Ten Commandments in the Supreme Court’s courtroom (left). There are, in fact, many other representations of the Ten Commandments in that building.

Moses with DecalogueMany who learn of the Decalogue’s presence in that courtroom are naturally puzzled by such a display because this is the same Court that has shown repeated hostility to Ten Commandments displays in other courtrooms and public buildings. In Stone v. Graham in 1980, the Supreme Court held that Kentucky schools could not display the Ten Commandments on classroom walls because “[I]f the posted copies of the Ten Commandments are to have any effect at all, it will be to induce the schoolchildren to read, meditate upon, perhaps to venerate and obey, the Commandments,” which, the Court said, is “not a permissible state objective under the Establishment Clause.” More recently, the Court just last year told McCreary County, Kentucky that its Ten Commandments display had to go, but that a Ten Commandments monument in Texas could stay. Perhaps mindful of the irony, the Court excused its own Ten Commandments display (left) because it is “in the company of 17 other lawgivers, most of them secular figures.”

The Court should know that the Constitution does not require the public display of God’s law to be crowded out by an overwhelming counterbalance of “secular figures” or documents.

Apparently, the architects and designers of the Supreme Court’s building, built in 1935, did not foresee that its occupants-to-be would be stripping the public square of references to God because, throughout the Supreme Court’s building, representations of the Ten Commandments abound. In addition to the frieze with Moses highlighted above, here are some examples of the Ten Commandments in the Supreme Court building, all of which can be seen on the Court’s website.


TEN COMMANDMENTS AT THE SUPREME COURT

Click on pictures below for further information at Supreme Court’s website.

Moses with Two Tablets on the East Face


 

Moses on the West Exterior Facade


 

Ten Commandments on Front Bronze Doors


 

Moses and Ten Commandments in Great Hall (8 times)
 


 

Ten Commandments on Wooden Interior Courtroom Doors


 

Ten Commandments in Frieze Above Bench

This marble frieze featuring a tablet or tableau with Roman numerals I through X directly above the Chief Justice’s chair is identified by the Supreme Court Curator’s Office as “The Bill of Rights,” and not the Ten Commandments. The Curator claims to have found, within the past few years, a letter from the sculptor describing this as the Bill of Rights. However, the context of the frieze depicts classical figures and symbols of law and government, which would make the Ten Commandments much more appropriate to the theme than the Bill of Rights, more especially in light of the prevalence of the Ten Commandments symbols throughout the building—in Roman numerals—and the corresponding lack of such Bill of Rights symbols. Moreover, the Congressional Quarterly’s Guide to the United States Supreme Court (1979) identified this symbol as a “tableau of the Ten Commandments,” as does a 1986 National Historic Landmark book on the National Park Service’s website here. What do you think? Commandments or Amendments?

Do you now see why it would be awfully hypocritical for the Supreme Court to banish any display of the Ten Commandments from public view? Any sandblasting of such displays would have to start with their building, and it would certainly take awhile. Instead of drawing fine distinctions about “context” and crowds of “secular figures,” the Court should just come clean and admit that no public display of the Ten Commandments violates the First Amendment, including their own.

SOURCE: The Ten Commandments in the Supreme Court building at Firm Foundation


http://www.ten-commandments.us


      

             

"And I will punish the world for their evil, and the wicked for their iniquity; and I will cause the arrogancy of the proud to cease, and will lay low the haughtiness of the terrible." —Isaiah 13:11


Ye Must Be Born Again! | You Need HIS Righteousness!